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Comic Book Review: Hawkeye #007

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Hawkeye has always been one of my favorite Avengers. He has an attitude.  He has no superpowers but can hold his own against some of the toughest villains.  Some people compare him to DC’s Green Arrow but I think there is no comparison.

Since the mid 80s, I have been picking up the various Hawkeye mini series.  I always enjoy these.  Hawkeye can be a fun and adventuring hero.

Hawkeye now has his own ongoing series. But this series focuses on his secret (or not so secret) Identity, Clint Barton, and his protege Kate Bishop.  Kate used the Hawkeye identity a few years ago when Clint took on the name of Ronin.  They both refer to each other as Hawkeye.

Credits:
Hawkeye-Issue # 007
Marvel Comics
Writer: Matt Fraction
Artist: Steve Lieber and Jesse Hamm
Colorist: Matt Hollingsworth
Letters: Chris Eliopoulos
Cover: David Aja

Plot: (Major Plot Spoilers)
Hurricane Sandy is hitting the New York area.  One of Clint’s neighbors, Grills  (nickname), needs help from Clint. Grills’ older father lives alone in Rockaway Beach and will not leave. Clint and Grills head out to Rockaway Beach in an attempt to help Grills father and hopefully get him out of there.  Shortly after Grills and Clint arrive, a flood from the hurricane comes crashing through and filled up the basement and first floor of this home.  There ends up being a rowboat in the attic and they use to get out alive.

Meanwhile, Kate is a bridesmaid-To-Be and is at a bridal shower in a hotel in New Jersey.  The power goes out and the city is flooded. Around noon of the next day, the mother of the bride to be didn’t bring her medications with her and is having health issues.  Kate has to swim through a flooded parking garage to get her bow and arrows and for her to get out of the hotel.  She finds a pharmacy through the devastation on the street.  Thieves have broken into the pharmacy and are still there. Kate attempts to stop them but a thief was hiding and knocked her unconscious. She awakes to find the citizens of the community, who were trying to put their lives back together, have captured the thieves.  Kate is able to get the needed medication and save her friend’s mother.

Review:
Art:
The art style of the Hawkeye is unique in today’s market.  It is a fairly muted color scheme with a ton of purple.  Even the cover has this strange but appealing art.

At times, the backgrounds are plain or non existent. But then certain panels with have unexpected details such as the ferris wheel.   This style reminds me of David Mazzucchelli’s Batman Year One .

I would not enjoy this style in most comic books.  I would hate it in Spider-Man.  I usually prefer a lot of details with crisp colors.  But it really works for Hawkeye. It fits with the story that is being told.

Story/Plot:
Hawkeye is not a superhero comicbook. It is the story of Clint and Kate and their adventures in life outside of the costume. It is the story of community and friendships.  There is a ton of talking in these issues.

This is a very cerebral issue.  It is heart warming.  This comic and series develop the characters and cause you to know the man and woman behind the Avengers Hawkeye(s).

Rarely does a story about a real life disaster work in comic format.  It is even more rare for a superhero based comic to work with this type of story. But this story not only worked but knocked it out of the park.

My REVIEW:

I love this rendition of Hawkeye.  I am usually a mask and cape kind of guy who enjoys a ton of action. This is so not my usual style but Fraction’s writing is superior on Hawkeye. The art is beautiful in its unique way.  I love this story.  This issue of Hawkeye was fantastic.

The most of stories in Hawkeye are individual stories. You can pick up an issue and enjoy it without reading the previous stories or without picking it up as a subscription. But once you read one, you will probably want the entire series.

Grade:A-

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